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 New England Society for the 
Treatment of Trauma and Dissociation

 

 

Does Child Abuse Permanently Alter the Human Brain?, Martin Teicher, MD, PhD

  • 30 Apr 2011
  • 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM
  • National Heritage Museum Lexington, MA

Registration

(depends on selected options)

Base fee:
  • Members may attend this meeting for FREE and pre-purchase 3.0 Continuing Education unit for $25.
  • Non-members who are full-time agency employed, a student, or a retiree, may attend at a reduced rate of $30.
  • Non Member Registration Fee.

Registration is closed

The New England Society for the Treatment of Trauma and Dissociation presents

We strongly encourage pre-registration for both members and non-members.


 

In this workshop Dr. Teicher will present pioneering research that he and his group have conducted on the effects of childhood maltreatment on brain development and behavior. His data indicates that there are sensitive periods in which specific brain regions are particularly vulnerable to the effects of childhood sexual abuse. In addition he will present results from imaging studies examining the unique neurobiological consequences of different forms of traumatic experiences such as childhood sexual abuse, parental verbal abuse, witnessing domestic violence, and harsh corporal punishment.  Neurobiological effects that correlate with symptoms of dissociation will be discussed.

 

Download the Event Flyer.

 

About Dr. Teicher

Martin H. Teicher, M.D., Ph.D. is the Director of the Developmental Biopsychiatry Research Program at McLean Hospital and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He has authored or co-authored nearly 200 scientific papers or book chapters and holds 13 U.S. Patents.  Dr. Teicher is known as an astute clinician who has made unique, sometimes controversial observations that have had substantial impact on clinical practice.  

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